ojkelly
Paranoid Mode

Updated a year ago

Paranoid Mode

An opinionated trust-nothing guide to setting up and using PGP keys in a post-Snowden world.

This is written for a threat model of either a nation state or close enough to one. As such is may need more hardware than you expect. Don't let that deter you.

The hardware required can be purchased for less than $150USD. If you have an old computer lying around you can probably use that.

You should follow this guide if you are a programmer, journalist, network administrator or sysadmin, or someone who just uses ssh regularly.

Pull Requests are welcome. There's an edit link on every page.

Assumed Knowledge

Writing a guide like this, it's hard to cater to all knowledge levels. This guide is written with the following assumptions:

  • You are using Linux, Unix or OS X (accepting pull requests for Windows instructions)
  • You can use terminal
    • You don't need to have mastered it, but you need to know what it is, and how to open it up

Some things you might not know that will help you

  • crtl-c will cancel a running command in terminal
    • useful when something gets stuck, you hit the wrong command or you need to stop something
  • up and down let you cycle recent commands
  • In Tails and other Linux terminals to copy text from the terminal you use Shift-Ctrl-C and Shift-Ctrl-V
  • In Tails you need to be root to access an OpenPGP smartcard (that's the Yubikey)

You should also know that there are known malware programs who's only job is to scan everything it can looking for private keys. These keys are super obvious as they always start with:

  -----BEGIN PGP PRIVATE KEY BLOCK-----

So yes, be paranoid about your private key touching any networked computer, it will take barely a second for the key to be exfiltrated, and rendered insecure. And you will likely never know if this has actually happened.

What you will be able to do

After completing this guide you will be able to:

  • receive and decrypt files and emails encrypted with your public key,
  • sign files, text and other peoples public keys
  • authenticate yourself using PGP